PET PORTRAIT FAQs

How do you create a pet portrait?

There are two main steps involved in creating your pet portrait. First, I will create a ‘rough’ - a basic sketch of your pet portrait to ensure I have everything in the right proportions. This will then be emailed to you for approval. Next, the rough is transferred into watercolour paper using a lightbox and watercolour pencil. Then I begin painting - creating the finished artwork by layering the watercolour paint. Your pet portrait will be created with Winsor & Newton Artist Watercolours on 300gsm Hot Press Arches paper.

How long does it take to complete a pet portrait?

Depending on the complexity of the pet in question, it can take from 1-2 weeks or much more! It just depends. Please note also that I am often working on many projects at once. If you have a specific deadline for your commission, please get in touch before purchasing to ensure I can complete it in time.

I would like something quirky added to my pet portrait - like a battle helmut! Can that be done?

It sure can! Please get in touch prior to making your booking to discuss this as it does mean the job will take a little longer to complete.

What sizes are available?

At this stage, I have A5, 21x21cm square and A4 sizes available.

Will my pet portrait be framed?

No - I will leave that to you to find the perfect frame that will suit your home décor. If you are in Port Macquarie, I recommend Sunset Framing and Gallery and Canvas Momentz to help you with your framing needs.

How do I pay for my pet portrait?

To confirm your booking, you will pay 50% upfront. I will then send an invoice for the remaining 50% which can be paid via direct deposit (or I can send a Paypal invoice if preferred) on receipt of the completed artwork.

What photos do I need to provide?

Yes! I work from photos to capture your pet as accurately as possible. With this in mind, please take the following into account (and see the examples on the right).

Size
Photos taken on a smartphone are often not big enough in size (and do not capture the best detail), making it harder to accurately depict your pet. Please provide large file sizes so that I can zoom in and check out all those small details that make your pet who he or she is. You can use file transfer services such as Dropbox or Google Drive if they are too big to email.

Lighting
Natural, outside light is the best to take your pet’s photo. Either early morning or later in the afternoon has the best light - and also a bright, overcast day. Avoid taking your pet’s photo in bright sunlight as it can often distort his or her true colourings and leave some areas to bright, while others are too dark. If taking your pet’s photo indoors, just look for some natural lighting, near a window for example. And avoid using flash.

Position
The best angle to photograph your pet is down at his or her eye level. Try to take photos as close to your pet as possible, from the chest up for example. And the best position is when he or she is sitting upright.

Details
Most importantly, please make sure his or her eyes are open and clear (not in shadow). As the old quote from Thomas Phaer says, “The eyes are the windows of the soul”.

Could be closer, but the details are clear and the lighting is not too bad.

Could be closer, but the details are clear and the lighting is not too bad.

Nice and close with clear details and excellent lighting.

Nice and close with clear details and excellent lighting.

Nice close image with clear details and excellent lighting.

Nice close image with clear details and excellent lighting.